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How To Kick Your Thyroid’s Ass: Thylectable Reads, Part III And A Giveaway!

Post Published: 03 January 2010
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Category: Column, How To Kick Your Thyroid's Ass, Thyroid Nutrition and Health
This post currently has 38 responses. Leave a comment

It was in Kansas City over the winter holiday that I found Dr. Mercola’s The No-Grain Diet in a little used bookstore.   It was an unexpected find and the best present to buy myself because I’m a big fan of his (big is an understatement).   His ideas make so much sense to me, and he provides the scientific research to back up his claims.   He’s also very meticulous and delves into things in a very deep way, not leaving anything out of his line of vision.   In my opinion, he’s very unique in this way. I also like him because he slants negative — telling us the things to avoid, what’s dangerous — those things to be wary of.   I enjoy that because I think most of us already innately know what’s healthy; what’s more important is learning what isn’t healthy in this toxic environment of ours.   Not to mention, he’s very aware of thyroid, endocrine, and autoimmune health.

Because I follow Dr. Mercola’s writing via his website, I assumed The No-Grain Diet would be an extension of the same voice and extensive research.   However, I was definitely surprised by this book because it is nothing like the Dr. Mercola I have come to know and like via the internet.

The No-Grain Diet is very light on research.   It’s more of a very basic primer in grain consumption.   The main reason Dr. Mercola advocates eliminating grains in this book is because it causes a destructive cycle of blood sugar and insulin spikes.   This, then, leads to weight gain and health problems.   That’s it — no more research.   No mention of antinutrients, candida overgrowth caused by grains, mycotoxins on grains, genetic modification of some grains, that many grains are bleached with chemicals and endocrine disruptors, or the opiodic nature of grains.   There is a one-paragraph mention of gluten intolerance.

Most of this book felt like one big prologue.   He keeps leading into teasers for what the grain-free diet will be like.   It gets tiring — you can only read so many times that in the next chapter there will be more information on such and such.

Mercola delves deeply into the emotional issues surrounding grain over-consumption. He provides his own technique for overcoming an emotional food addiction, via the Emotional Freedom Technique, which is a sort of acupressure.   It’s a simple tapping of one’s fingers on certain pressure points on their body to release tension.   Because of all of that, this book is ideal for someone really battling carbohydrate addiction.   For anyone who feels they’re struggling with this, The No-Grain Diet would be an invaluable resource because it provides tools to not simply restrict carb consumption (as on traditional low-carb or low-calorie diets), but to overcome and conquer it.

There is a great section on which kinds of foods we should be eating: good fats, clean protein sources, probiotics, certain dairy products, fresh vegetables, green juices, low-sugar and low-starch goods, and organics whenever possible.   These very specific recommendations of Dr. Mercola’s prove that he’s very in-tune with the state of our food supply and the many ways it can be toxic to our bodies.   He also explains why clean water for drinking and bathing is important (chlorine and fluoride), as well as why getting enough sunlight and sleep and exercise is biologically important.   There are also a ton of yummy-looking recipes to get you launched on your grain-free eating plan, as well as gradations to the diet so you can choose a level that’s comfortable for you.

If you’re looking for delicious grain-free recipes (and so many of them at that), as well as the tools to conquer carb and grain addiction, this is the book for you.   If you’re hoping for extensive food science, keep looking; that’s just not what this book is about.   For me, this was disappointing.   The book is a quick read, however, which is great for anyone really serious about grain-free eating — you can read it quickly and then get started on the eating plan right away.   More than anything, The No-Grain Diet is a very practical approach to healthy eating and is ideal as a how-to manual.

***

If you have a health story or healthy New Year’s resolution you’d like to share, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment!,   We all need all the support and encouragement we can get and this is the best time to make your personal health commitments public — so we can learn from each other.   Also, we’re having a discussion about oats and oatmeal over on our forum.   Be sure to learn more about this grain and share your knowledge with us!

And before you go — this week we’re pleased to announce a giveaway of probiotic supplements from Swanson Vitamins! Wooo hoooo!,   We all love our probiotics, right?,   I take one or two daily and put my bodily flora as top priority (sounds funny, but I’m not kidding). To enter to win this most fabulous, one-of-the-best probiotics out there, simply leave a comment telling us one happy, lovely, warm and fuzzy moment from your winter holiday.   To gain another entry, link this post on your Twitter, Facebook, Digg, or StumbleUpon, or email this post to five friends.   Leave a comment telling us what you did and how many entries you have.   We will announce the winner next week in this column, as chosen by Random.org.

Until Next Week,

Love Always,

Liz

Have a question, comment, story, love letter, or rant/rave to send me?: Liz@DearThyroid.com

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38 Responses to “How To Kick Your Thyroid’s Ass: Thylectable Reads, Part III And A Giveaway!

  1. Cyndi Woodruff says:

    I had several special moments with my grand kids! We did a lot of playing, laughing and hugging. One really amazing moment was my 22-month-old grand daughter saying “I love you” for the first time—–to ME!!!!!!

  2. LizSchau says:

    Awww, Cindy.. that is such a sweet memory! What a wonderful holiday memory!

    I also see you posted on Facebook, for an extra entry.

    🙂

  3. My favorite memory from this holiday season was spending Christmas Eve with my hubby and kids. We played games, played with Playdough (don’t ask), and just had an amazing time. They’re both in the thick of teendom, so it was wonderful to spend an entire evening having fun with them.

  4. LizSchau says:

    Pamela, that sounds so nice! Getting teens to connect with the family is sometimes challenging, just based on my own teenaged years. :/ That’s great that you all got a chance to connect.

    Thanks for entering! Also, thanks for helping us answer our oats question on the forum!

  5. amy says:

    Christmas Highlights for me was my daughter. She had just turned three and a whole new realm of curiosity and understanding came into play. It was very cool to see her understand what Christmas is about for our family. And watching her open presents…so fun! She blesses me so much!

    I have read this book by Dr. Mercola. I read the going against the grain by Melissa Diane Smith first and personally liked it much better. It has a lot more info in it. But, the book by Mercola is a good basic.

  6. Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by lejeal: Are you a fan of Dr. Mercola? Have you read his book “The No-Grain Diet”? Come read my criticisms/praise http://bit.ly/8jQdU6

  7. LizSchau says:

    Amy, that’s so cute. I think when there are little ones in the family, the holidays become more and more about them and their wonderment. 🙂 Thanks for your entry!

    So, you sort of got the same impression from the book? — more basic and how-to than informational? I’m glad to hear you enjoyed “Going Against The Grain”. That is one of my all-time favorite health books. I love it.

  8. LizSchau says:

    Well Quin, even if you have no good story, we’re still entering you to win, if that’s okay. Was it a rough holiday? I’m sorry to hear that, if so. 🙁

  9. Shan McKenzie says:

    My husband is a real joker. We had a sparse christmas, agreeing that gifts would be around the 2$ mark. At a family lunch, I remembered I had bought him a Nashi pear that I was going to wrap for fun, but was still in the fridge at home. I said “Just remembered, I’ve got another present for you when we get home” Well he put on his most entertaining “I’m going to get lucky” face. Best part was my Mum laughed so much. So good to see as she recently lost her second husband and my dad also passed around christmas. So much love this xmas!

    • LizSchau says:

      Shan, that’s a great story. 🙂 Glad to hear you had a nice holiday, despite the tragic events surrounding it

  10. Kathy says:

    Believe it or not, our warmest, fuzziest moments came on New Year’s Eve when we had a 2009 calendar burning party. Our entire family faced several traumas and tragedies over the year, so my sister decided that it was a year that we should not wish on anyone, and we had to make it go away. The family got together and my sister’s home and after celebrating inside for awhile, we all took our calendars outside to where a small but significantly hot bonfire was being built. With the fire roaring, we stood around and shared stories from the year. When it was announced that it was finally time, we threw our calendars into the flames one by one. Laughter, tears, singing and then back to cheering and laughter, we let the year go and vowed to march into 2010 together.

    • LizSchau says:

      Kathy, I think that’s the most amazing tradition I’ve ever heard of. I need to start doing that with my family. Absolutely love the take on all the tragedy.

  11. Misty says:

    My favorite moment was when work discovered I still had two weeks of vacation I needed to use before the end of the year and I was able to spend the best two weeks of Christmas holiday with my little ones.

  12. Heather says:

    The best part of Christmas was having my dad home after he was in the neuro ICU for a very scary 10 days just after Thanksgiving! He was well & able to participate in all of the family functions.

  13. Cyndi Woodruff says:

    Kathy,

    I just had to say that I love the idea of burning the past and moving on, together, into the brighter future! We had a very hard year, too. I have been working really hard to get my hubby to see the new year with more positive thinking. Like many, his business has suffered terribly the past couple of years.

    Here’s to a MUCH better 2010 for us all.

  14. LizSchau says:

    Heather, so sorry to hear your dad went through that tough time. Glad he’s doing okay now and your holiday was nice. 🙂

    I also see that you linked on Facebook and Twitter

  15. LizSchau says:

    Cyndi, YOU SAID IT!!! 2010 WILL be better!

  16. Robyn says:

    Quin, I’m with ya. 2009–lotsa bad and just a little good. Holidays not so hot either. But, it’s done, and 2010 will be better!

    Great article Liz, and timely. You seem to read my mind about the next thing on my list to look into! Thanks!

  17. LizSchau says:

    Great Robyn! Check it out if you like.

    Sorry your holiday wasn’t quite ideal either. :/ This year has got to be better for us all!

  18. Lori says:

    Kathy, I love the tradition of burning the calendars.

    Liz, thanks for your review. A basic is all I can handle right now but I really feel I need to learn about their significance or insignificance, as it relates to overall health as well as management of hashi.

    In addition to our traditional holiday celebrations, we had a surprise celebration for my mother-in-law as it was her 35th year anniversary of sobriety. We had a special medallion and ice cream cake with the #35 on it. Because of my husband planning this, it brought all her children together at the same time, which never happens for her, so I warmed my heart to see her so happy.

    I am twittering it in a minute.

  19. Kelly Ann T. says:

    A friend of mine had a bunch of friends over to her house for New Years Eve. We had a great time playing dominos, and wii.
    I also spent time with my niece and nephew while they were on christmas break. We baked cookies, played wii and watched some christmas specials together.

    I will be twittering too.

  20. Lolly says:

    Great Article once again Liz still ahven;t forgotten about my diet.

    The best past about Christmas was seeing my 3 year old Granddaughter think she had only got a stocking full of gifts, then we took her into the lounge what does she see not the mountain of presents but Santa’s plate empty with just crumbs on it and Rudolph’s carrot all chewed up (note to self get my teeth checked I nearly broke it on that carrot) that was a Kodak moment one we didn’t even capture she would have been just as contented with the few presents she had in the her Minnie Mouse stocking.

  21. Alexia says:

    My nephew got out of Yemin 2 days before the siege. He was at University learning Arabic and Farsi

  22. Ericka says:

    My warm fuzzy was being able to help a single mother of three with her Christmas this year. I have always talked about “adopting” a family but end up just buying for my boys. This year, I was determined to make it happen and did.

  23. Sandy says:

    On Christmas Day, while at my parents house, 2 of my 3 sons called me! Hey, 2 outta 3 ain’t bad, and I had just talked to the youngest son the day before (they are 20, 22,and 23). Anyway, I talked to my oldest son for about an hour and I hadn’t talked to him in about 8 months!! Darn kids have lives now, ya know? It was nice to catch up.

  24. Lynn says:

    My fondest memory of this past christmas was putting up a very old porcelain angel that was given to my fiancee’ from his 85 year old godmother this past year. We placed her on top of our christmas tree after we had decorated it and when we plugged in the tree the angel lit up and her wings started to move. I was so touched by this, that I started to cry. She was so beautiful. We called Lillian his godmother the next day to tell her..and she said that her husband had given her the angel many years ago and had bought it for her overseas. (he was in the navy) When she first put it on her tree many years ago she said she also cried. Lillian was so happy to pass down to us this special Christmas Angel. I will treasure it always <3

  25. Kat Caverly says:

    Love this article and Mercola. Fresh, local, seasonal food; grassfed, organic, direct from the farm. This year I am going to take that to the next level and really know better the foods I put into my body.

  26. Vicki Wurgler says:

    my best memory will be having our grandkids spend their holiday vacation with us and taking them cross-country ski – we all had a great time and had hot cocoa after!

  27. LizSchau says:

    Lolly, that is adorable!

  28. LizSchau says:

    Alexia, that is amazing. Thank you SO much for sharing that with us!

  29. LizSchau says:

    Ericka, that’s so great. Thanks for sharing and entering!

  30. LizSchau says:

    Sandy, that’s great that you guys got to catch up! It can be difficult when everyone’s all over the country (or the world for that matter). 🙂

  31. LizSchau says:

    Lynn, that is so sweet. What a meaningful memory you have. 🙂

  32. LizSchau says:

    Good for you Kat! You’re my kind of woman! Have you noticed any improvements in your health?

  33. LizSchau says:

    Vicki, WOW! How fun! And everyone had a great time with no bruises or broken bones?? 🙂

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