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Can’t Connect the Dot Symptoms

Post Published: 22 January 2014
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Category: Dear Thyroid Letters
This post currently has 10 responses. Leave a comment

cant connect the dots symptoms of hypothyroidism

Dear thyroid,

I am 19. Been diagnosed since Feb 2012. Complete contradiction.

It’s funny because its been 2 years in Feb since I’ve been diagnosed. Why is that funny? Easy, I do not exactly fit the definition of hypothyroidism. I cannot gain weight.

In fact, I’m 19 years old and have never been 120 pounds. I’ve barely hit 115.

I enjoy sharing my story because I am such a contradiction. Even my endocrinologist can’t figure me out. I eat whatever I want whenever and literally don’t gain anything. I don’t even exercise so I know that’s not what’s causing it.

I enjoy listening and talking to people about this because before and when I was diagnosed I had never heard of such thing.

Guess you really do learn something new every day!

A-

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10 Responses to “Can’t Connect the Dot Symptoms”

  1. Debra says:

    I was the same way for years. Grew up skinny and wore my kids fourth grade clothes when I was 34. Ate all I wanted whenever I wanted. Bags of chocolate and sweets daily. Well, I found the answer when I was in my forties and my thyroid burned out. Leaving me to gain 75 lbs in less than two months. Thats right. Not only did a diagnosis of Hypothyroidism show up but my levels were so screwed up and off the charts that I almost died. I was HYPERthyroidism at the same time and never was it caught. I have Hashimtos and Graves disease both. Took me a long time to get most of the weigbt off. Have 20 lbs left to go. Total thyroidectomy in 2009 and dont regret it. I remember my mother even took me to the doc when i was little because I was so tiny and never grew.

  2. Shae says:

    Luckiy, I’m in the same boat! I’m 36, I was only diagnosed in 2012, but I’ve had symptoms since 1996. I’m 5’8, and I’m 112 pounds… the same weight I’ve been since high school. I’m tiny, but in a healthy way, I don’t look frail. I have so many other difficult symptoms – but weight gain is certainly not one for me.

  3. Danielle says:

    I have this issue too. I’ve been on a high calorie diet for the last 3 yrs and have managed to gain only 3llb. It’s been a depressing process. This is a very weird illness.

  4. Ruth Feldman says:

    Some people do not gain weight with hypothyroidism, just like most cannot stand cold but a few cannot bear heat. When I was 45, I lost my short term memory completely and was physically weak; turned out it was due to a slow Hashimoto’s process that took 20 years. I asked my doctor to test my thyroid function and she did not want to do it; I had a full head of hair, was slender, no puffy face. When finally tested, she called me in and, with a surprised look on her face, said, “You only have 10% thyroid function; you don’t look like you have such a low thyroid.” There are lists in Mary Shomon’s books that give all the disparate and conflicting symptoms of thyroid problems.

  5. Ashleyy713x says:

    I am very sensitive to cold and have horrible memory. That’s the problem, I have many symptoms of HYPOthyroidism but the major fact that I can’t gain weight is odd. I am considering having my thyroid removed but I’m a little uneasy about it. Thoughts ?

  6. Jacqueline Boielau says:

    Hi, I’m now nearing 52, female and was diagnosed shortly after having my first beautiful babe 20 years ago. I am hypo and have learned alot of things along the way in life, naturally on my own because professionals in the medical field(doctors, specialists) know how to diagnose and pharmaceutical treat the condition, but never mention the nutritional knowledge on how to take care of it. This also includes nutritionists and dietitians.There are all sorts of crucifer vegetables and fruits one must AVOID and the information is there if you google “foods bad for thyroid conditions” Also this includes green tea, red wine and beer to avoid. Exercise is a very important part of ones life as well as drinking plenty of fluoride FREE water! If you enjoy tea, drink herbal and white tea which is the immature part of the green tea(green tea has to much fluoride absorbed into it from the soil). It is also important that you and your loved ones start to live a Gluten FREE life style. If you look further into gluten, you will find that an extremely high percentage of the worlds population is meant to eat a gluten free diet and that gluten is very harmful to our bodies and is the culprit to many diseases occurring in our lives including diabetes. The food stores, restaurants and bakeries are finally getting on board and realizing that this is not a FADE but a reality to our survival needs. Embrace your condition. We Live only once so do the best you can and be happy. Shortage of memory is ok. At least it is not Alzheimer’s. I have 3 children and my last one is now 3.5 She is amazing! My daughter of 20 is expecting her first baby in April and has recently been diagnosed with hypo as well. I’m now helping her to change her diet so that she can feel “normal”. I hope that this information will help a lot of you 🙂 “A toast to your health”

  7. Jacqueline Boielau says:

    ps there is also a natural compound chemical that is made up in a compound lab to compliment your thyroid medication called “Triiodo-L-Thyronine 4mcg ……also known as T3, is a thyroid hormone. It affects almost every physiological process in the body, including growth and development, metabolism, body temperature, and heart rate. I take one in the morning and one in evening.

  8. Jacqueline Boielau says:

    ps, one more and last is that if you suspect that you have a thyroid problem yet the medical field shows no results of this then have your Pituitary glands checked. They could be the problem instead.

  9. Kristina says:

    Is it possible there is a malabsorption problem or inability to absorb proper nutrients? I’ve heard of this with hypothyroidism.

  10. D. Clifford says:

    think in terms of the gut being the largest muscle in your body, and the need for additional thyroid becomes apparent. Gluten type allergic reactions are far more prevalent than given credit and a good gut cleansing with Monolauren helps with this. The malabsorption problem occurs with the dosage form of the thyroid as well food nutrients.

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